Wednesday, 21 December 2011

Men Crossing the Atlantic 1873

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Turner%2C_J._M._W._-_The_Fighting_T%C3%A9m%C3%A9raire_tugged_to_her_last_Berth_to_be_broken.jpg 

Stumbling on a great source like The Ships List doesn't happen very often. It made for a thoroughly interesting read. The names below are of a few men who travelled from France to Canada in 1873. The source does not state the gender of the passangers, so mistakes are possible. I attempted to guess their gender by other information provided, such as occupation, if they travelled alone, and whether their name was commonly used for girls or boys at this time. Most of the passangers were French but some came from Italy.

Achille
  
Alcide
 
Amédié

Anatole
 
Arsène

Athanase 

Baptiste

Blaise

Casimir

Clemense

Corantin

Constant

Etienne

Giacaomo

Goulven

Honoré

Hyppolyte

Laurent

Maçon  

Mathieu

Narcisse 

Pasquale

Philibert

Remy 

Stanislas 

Tousaint


There were two names that stuck out for me, Amédié and Hyppolyte.The first seems so pretty, soft and is only one letter away from Amelie that it sounds and looks as if it should be feminine, but it is actually a French translation of Amadeus, meaning 'love of God'. Hyppolyte stuck out due to the fact that I had issues determining whether it was traditionally a feminine or masculine name. The person by this name on the ship was just a baby, so there were no clues to be had there. In the end, it ended up on this list as it seems to be given more to men and because of Saint Hippolytus, a Roman priest. However, Hippolyte was also an Amazonian queen, a daughter of Ares. Blue or pink? I'm still not completely certain. Maybe this one should go to the green team.


Image: 'The Fighting Temeraire' by Turner.