Tuesday, 7 January 2014

English Male Names From 1802

File:Arthur Nelson - Landscape, with Dover Castle in the Distance - Google Art Project.jpg

I love a good early 19th century source full to the brink with great names. The Poll for Knights of the Shire to Represent the County of Kent, published in 1803, is such a source. The names mentioned below are of the freeholders of the county who had the right to vote for the knight they wanted to represent Kent. The three candidates were Sir Edward Knatchbull, Sir William Geary, and Filmer Honeywood.

The names below are exceptions; the traditional John, William and Thomas were the ones which appeared the most often in the freeholder list. Royal names were also very present, such as Edward, Charles, Stephen and George. There was a scattering of more obvious religious names, like Abraham and Adam, but they didn't appear as much as one would imagine. The two names which surprised me with how much they kept popping up were Clement and Valentine, names I tend to associated more with the Victorian period rather than the early 19th century. And there were other interesting surprises, too. Just take a look below.


Absalom
Alured
Apellas
Armigald
Augustine
Austen
Austin
Bailey
Barman
Barzillai
Bedo
Beecher
Boetius
Bold
Braneth
Bryant
Buttery
Byng
Carr
Casey
Chalinor
Clark
Claude
Copper
Creasy
Cruttall
Davies
Daw
Dearing
Denby
Dilnott
Dive
Drury
Eleazah
Elias
Esaius
Esau
Evan
Evenden
Everitt
Ewell
Finney
Fitch
Flavius
Freeman
Gam
Gibbon
Goddard
Haddarezer
Halke
Hammerden
Hammond
Harcourt
Harman
Hartrop
Henden
Hercules
Hodsall
Hooper
Hopkins
Horn
Horton
Houstonne
Hugham
Hunt
Hussey
Iden
Ingram
Inment
Innocent
Jarvis
Kelson
Kennett
King
Kingsford
Langford
LeGrand
Lepar
Liberty
Lilford
Lucas
Lupton
Lushington
Mace
Manley
Mantell
Marsh
Mercer
Mordecai
Morgan
Morris
Moseley
Musgrove
Nappiker
Nedmer
Neptune
Noble
Omden
Osborn
Otterway
Paulin
Pearce
Pellet
Perfect
Pilcher
Plumer
Redman
Renville
Rix
Sacket
Safery
Saunders
Shadrick
Sharp
Silk
Sion
Sladden
Slodden
Smith
Stedman
Steel
Thurston
Tilby
Timewell
Townley
Tress
Underdow






Most have a definite Georgian feel to them, but others feel so modern. Take Finney, Lucas, Morgan, Fitch, Casey, Clark, Austin and Bailey - they aren't 19th century at all! You wouldn't be able to tell by their names that these gentlemen lived more than 200 years ago. Then there are the ones I can see being used, even if they currently aren't; names like Iden, Henden, Noble, Tilby and Rix seem like they could well have a place in modern baby naming.

 Image: Landscape, with Dover Castle in the Distance by Arthur Nelson.